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Happy 50th Birthday to COBOL

Rest in Peace

People get very religious about Computing languages. C# vs Java, VB vs Delphi, C++ and LISP. But quite frankly, I somehow never expected developers to treat COBOL as a religion: No object-orientation (not one which has been accepted or used), no exception handling, and allowing lots of bad practices: GO-TOs, REDEFINES ...

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COBOL Business Rule projects are large projects

Lets do the job properly

Question is how bigger would the project become if they migrated to “maintainable” Java first? Would they have to migrate the whole thing – or just parts which is destined to be re-written as rules? Depending on the COBOL platform (IBM, ESQL, UNISYS – DMS-II, ….), it is possible to have part of the system in Java and leave the rest COBOL ...

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Business Rules in Legacy Modernization

COBOL Rules for Documentation or Rules for rete-type inference engine

Here at SoftwareMining, we get two types of interest in Business rules. In the first instance there are projects who simply want to re document the system or re-produce a functional specification for the purpose of rewrite. The 2nd set of interest is from organizations who would like to re-implement their system within a “rule-based” system. This COBOL rule-systems is the topic of my dicussion today.

James Taylor, writes an interesting blog on "Modernizing COBOL with business rules" ...

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COBOL Re-host vs COBOL Translation (to Legible Java or C#)

(Lets hope re-hosters keep their test routines, they'll be needed again)

Recently there has been a lot of activity in the Re-hosting world, as evident in quarterly reports of MicroFocus as well as the big rehosting companies.

But why would anyone rehost as oppose to translate? lets look at the pros and cons of each solution ...

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Is COBOL Dead? or will there be COBOL code on starship Enterprise?

In the 60's, the list of companies in the Fortune 500 was so stable that it took 20 years for a third of them to change. Now it takes only four years (source: The Economist). There is a lot of pressure for businesses are to remain competitive.

Will COBOL survive such business needs? ...

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